Acupressure - An Effective Treatment for Anxiety

Acupressure: An Effective Treatment for Anxiety

Can an effective treatment for anxiety be found in antiquity? Many medical experts say that it can, as the dual treatment of anxiety with ancient techniques and modern medical methods becomes increasingly popular in the United States and abroad. Specifically, the ancient practice of acupressure has been shown to have numerous advantageous effects on anxiety sufferers. But what exactly is this strange practice? Read on to find out.

What is Acupressure?

Acupressure is considered to be a form of alternative therapy in the Western world, but in the Eastern world, it’s everyday medicine. In countries such as China and Japan, it’s been used to treat illnesses for centuries.  In Eastern terminology, it involves the bio-electrical flow of energy which is called different names in different places. This energy is said to sustain life itself and is vital for the human body to function effectively. When this flow is operating in the proper balance, all is merry within the body. Unfortunately, negative energy can sometimes be an unwelcome invader, upsetting this perfect, healthy balance. When this happens, we can feel an entire host of unpleasant symptoms. Acupressure jumps into the picture that this point, and is deliberately used to affect pressure points in the body, thus “restoring the balance.”  These acupressure points are said to affect different afflictions in the body. For anxiety, certain points are stimulated to reduce muscle tension, which is wonderfully therapeutic for anxiety sufferers. In fact, many Western doctors do not believe in this “bio-electrical flow,” but they still believe that acupressure is effective. They attribute its benefits instead to improved blood circulation, increased endorphins and reduced muscle tension.

How Is It Performed?

Here is an example of a common way that is acupressure is used. First, you need to locate an acupressure point. One common acupressure point can be found behind the ears. Take your index finger and thumb and rub behind your ears until you begin to feel calm. For optimal results, you should try to do this several times a day. Don’t be surprised if you feel some tenderness or body aches, as this is normal. You can also use other parts of your body, such as your elbows and palms to stimulate these acupressure points.

Professional Acupuncture

If you don’t feel comfortable performing acupressure on yourself, or you’d rather receive it from an expert, you can set up an acupressure session with a practitioner, and these often last for an hour. Make sure to find a practitioner who is certified to practice this type of therapy. Remember, if you have rheumatoid arthritis, a bone disease, a spinal injury, or varicose veins, acupressure is not recommended for you because it can aggravate these conditions. Also, acupressure is not recommended for pregnant women because it can induce contractions, and we certainly don’t want that to happen! If anxiety is getting you down, acupressure is well worth a shot to give you a more relaxed and happier lifestyle.

 References:

“Acupressure Points and Massage Treatments.” 15 October 2012.<www.webmd.com>

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